Monthly Archives: August 2012

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I discovered that if I was selective about who I ???followed??? on Twitter ??? who I chose to pay attention to ??? I could learn things, even have a laugh, occasionally make a new friend. That meant actively examining the people that I do follow and evaluating whether, after attending to them for some time, I still believe they offer knowledge and/or entertainment in return for my attention. I had to try people, then decide to stop following people whose output didn???t pay off for me. I learned to look at who the people I learned to respect were following. I learned to harvest people to follow by examining Twitter lists of knowledgeable people. Then I learned to feed the network of people who follow me by sharing something not entirely trivial that reveals something about who I am and what I do, share links and knowledge I???ve gained that others who share my interests might benefit from, answer questions posed by those I follow and reply to those of my followers who address me.

http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-two.html

How Did Howard Rheingold Get So ???Net Smart????: An Interview (Part Two)

http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-two.html

I think you can tell by this point that I see socio-technological issues as confluences and hybrids of many technical, psychological, social developments. Time and again, the way a new communication technology changes society??is influenced by the way people use it, and the circumstances of their use. Chinese and Korean inventors created moveable type before Gutenberg, but there were so many differences in social circumstances. China had greater centralized political power at a time when Europe was divided among dozens of warring states. Elizabeth Eisenstein pointed out how Protestant theology of individual Bible-reading intersected with the technology of the printing press and the emerging entrepreneurial capitalism of the printing trade ??? all circumstances that were unique to a time and a place and to strong beliefs.

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How Did Howard Rheingold Get So ???Net Smart????: An Interview (Part Two)

http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-two.html

There has been a tendency to adopt totalizing views about emerging technologies, so that Twitter either ???destroys our attention span??? or it ???paves the way for revolutions around the world.??? Yet, as you note early on, ???Twitter is a recent example of a social media which can either be a waste of time or a multiplier of effort for the person who uses it, depending on how knowledgible the person is in the three related literacies of attentional discipline, collaborative know-how and net saavy.??? This approach reframes the question away from technological determinism and onto issues of use and knowledge, which reflect an awareness of human agency (both collective and individual) in terms of what we do with media.

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How Did Howard Rheingold Get So ???Net Smart???: An Interview (Part One)

I do teach the literacies in??Net Smart??to the students in my virtual community/social media class at Stanford, but it???s in the context of a broader inquiry. The literacies are necessary to ask the larger questions about community, collective action, identity, the public sphere, etc. Students are introduced to forums as group voice, blogs as (networked) individual voice, mindmaps as lateral and visual thinking, social bookmarking as collective intelligence, wikis as collaborative platforms. Then they need to use their skills in these media to propose, organize, document, and present collaborative projects in groups of four.??In the process, we consciously and deliberately approached our subject matter as a learning community in which classroom discussions expand online, students blog reflectively about what their learning shows them about the media they use, student co-teaching teams take turns co-teaching a classroom session with the professor.

The underlying methodology (Engelbart!) is enabled by the technology, but the methodology is what is important ??? giving students a means to continue discursive inquiry beyond the classroom, to tap into worldwide networks of knowledge and expertise, to talk among themselves instead of speaking when called upon by the professor. Making it easier for students to learn together and to take advantage of the infosphere beyond their classroom and their library is what makes for a pedagogy of co-learning. Much of what I do and what Cathy Davidson does in pursuit of co-learner can and should be done with index cards, whiteboards, and colored sticky notes.??

How Did Howard Rheingold Get So ???Net Smart???: An Interview (Part One)

So digital literacies of attention, crap detection, participation,
collaboration, and network smarts constitute a critical uncertainty.
The answer to ???is this stuff any good for us??? is, I strongly believe:
???It depends on what people know, and how many of them know it.??? Just
as the decades after Gutenberg???s invention saw the expansion of the
literate population from thousands to millions, we???re seeing the
diffusion of new literacies that are already changing the world more
profoundly than print did in its first decades.

http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-…

How Did Howard Rheingold Get So ???Net Smart???: An Interview (Part One)

In??Smart Mobs??I was forced to learn a little about sociology to try to make sense of the ways large groups of people were beginning to behave collectively, now that billions of people have the web in their pockets. And in my research for these books, I grew fascinated with the archaeology of literacy ???Elizabeth Eisenstein???s work on the impact of the printing press in Europe, the drama of Denise Schmandt-Besserat???s worldwide investigation of clay artifacts that led to her definitive history of the origin of writing, Marshall McLuhan???s insistence that printing presses change the way people see and deal with the world.

Working backward from McLuhan to Innis, Ong, and McLuhan???s colleague Robert K. Logan, I began seeing the broad picture of how new cultural mind tools enabled and initiated changes in the thinking of individuals and the functioning of societies. Working forward from the 1960s visions of JCR Licklider and Douglas Engelbart, it seemed to me that ???augmenting human intellect,??? as Engelbart framed it, was a historic repurposing of devices originally designed for ballistics calculations. Engelbart was well aware of the role of human learning and literacies in the future system he proposed, which he described as comprising ???humans, using language, artifacts, methodology, and training.???

So now we have more than two billion people with Internet access, more than five billion mobile telephones. The mind-amplifying devices that Engelbart envisioned are in people???s pockets. The networks that link people and devices are global and heading toward ubiquitous. What does that mean? We???ve seen serious critics like Sherry Turkle and Nicholas Carr eloquently illuminating the darker sides and hidden costs of our fascination with social media. And we???ve seen an enormous amount of moral panic, based on very little or no empirical basis, about fears that using the web is making individuals and cultures shallow.